10x10 Challenge Part 2

by - February 21, 2018

It’s here! The results of my 10x10 capsule wardrobe! 


After reading Wear No Evil (my review's right here in case you missed it), I decided to test some minimalist/conscious/sustainable fashion experiments. 

First up: a 10x10 challenge (got the idea from Style Bee)


Over the ten days, I came up with eight outfits: 


I wore both the striped top with jeans and the white tee with jeans and the cardigan twice. (I'm wearing my tan sweater underneath that blanket scarf on the left. It was really cold that day!)

The pros
  1. A capsule wardrobe makes mornings a breeze: Every day I chose between 5 shirts/sweaters, 4 bottoms (2 pants, 2 skirts), and an optional cardigan. They all matched so I didn’t matter that my brain isn’t always functioning at full capacity in the morning. 
  2. A capsule wardrobe makes packing a breeze: I went to my parents’ house for a long weekend and packed 2 shirts, a pair of jeans, a skirt for church, and a cardigan. I usually do some form of this when I pack, but the advance planning made the choices for me. 
  3. A capsule wardrobe forces me to think of new outfit combinations: I never would have thought to combine my striped tee with my black pencil skirt, but I quite liked the result. In a fit of inspiration, I pulled together 10 completely different pieces from my wardrobe and mentally played around with different outfit combinations. If you’re ever feeling stumped for new outfit ideas without having to buy new clothes, grab 10 items from your closet and play around. You’ll be surprised what you come up with!
The cons
  1. The neutrals and basics life is not for me: This is particular to the pieces that I chose, but was still eye-opening for me. I probably got more use out of my t-shirts in those ten days than I had since I got them. While outfits made up of basic pieces in neutral colors are convenient when I’m in a rush or don’t know what else to wear, they drive me crazy when worn on a daily basis. I found myself yearning for a nice purple (or even a blue that wasn’t navy).
  2. The point was to use what I already own, but I only used a few pieces: In my daily rush, I forgot to wear my long black skirt. If I didn’t own a lot of clothes, it would make perfect sense to create regular capsule wardrobes to make the most of what I own, but I own more than 10 items of clothing. A lot more…
My conclusions
  1. I don’t need a capsule wardrobe to experiment with different outfit combinations. All I have to do is grab a few pieces and play around. 
  2. I will be using capsule wardrobes for packing and busier times (such as finals and performances).
  3. Even if I prefer a little more variety, I really don’t need a ton of clothes to come up with decent outfits.
So what’s next in my sustainable style journey? 

I’m going to take a short break from talking about fashion (although you can still catch my #30wearswednesday on instagram and outfit posts on Friday) and talk about a different eco-conscious area, one that I’ve been working toward for a few years now: eco-friendly (and skin-friendly!) make up. 

Eco-friendly alternatives:


Have you ever tried a capsule wardrobe? How did it go? What do you think about them? 

Stay amiable!

Amy

You May Also Like

0 comments

Get your Mental Health Emergency Kit Workbook!

* indicates required